How to Create an Effective Technology Lesson

All too often I see teachers who struggle to teach effective technology lessons. Really, an effective technology lesson should mirror an effective teaching lesson but with a few changes.

The Pre-Lesson:
Just like any lesson, you should start with the end in mind. What is the big ideas and smaller outcomes? Keep it specific and too the point. Make sure that it connects with the rest of the curriculum. Long gone are the days of teaching specific skills out of context such as how to format a paragraph (unless you are teaching it in a writing context). In other words, don’t teach technology skills in isolation. I usually think about a project that I want students to work on and then break it up into smaller mini-lessons that will key on some specific skills. For example, one project I did last year with the Grade 3s was designing a Favorite Author poster using Comic Life. I knew that most students hadn’t used this program before. So first I created a sample product on my own. I can’t stress how important this step is. By creating a project of your own, it allows you to see all the steps involved, work out any bugs or potential issues, and see it from a kid’s point of view. If you have already done this before, then no need to do it again unless there have been some significant updates to the program. This step is also important because you want to give a sample that students can work towards. This obviously motivates them and gives them a clear end in mind.

Here is the sample project I gave the kids:

Screen shot 2010-08-12 at 11.38.23 AM

The Lesson (10 minutes max):

You need to hook students in somehow. Start with a story like, “I was reading this book the other day by Lemony Snicket and I realized how much I enjoyed all his books. I decided that I wanted to create a poster to show other people why I like him and promote his books”. Make sure you have a good visual on your SMART board or projector at this point. Then give the challenge to students. Explain the goal and why they are doing the project. Do a “walk-through” of how to create a new one, breaking them down into no more than 5 steps. Review the steps (or have students tell the steps back to you). Sometimes if it isn’t the first time, I let the students who can tell me or show me the steps back go first to the computer as a bit of a reward (just make sure they still listen to the remaining steps). I also like to show a couple of advanced tools and say, “Hmmm…I wonder what this tool does. That would be really cool if someone could discover what it does” This allows for a bit of differentiation and motivates students for extension. I usually go over a checklist or assessment rubric just before they go as well.
Here is an example one I did for a podcast:

Podcast Assessment

Post Lesson:

I like to spend 3-5 minutes at the end of the lesson to wrap it up. This actually is an often overlooked step but essential for meta-cognition processing. Allowing a few minutes to share what they made (show their work if possible) or explain some discoveries of some new features is very important. Always try and make time for this.

So that’s it in a nut-shell. It really just comes down to good teaching practices. It really is a special blend of art and science. The art is in the delivery and the science is the formula and preparation. But if you are unfamiliar with a program or project, you really need to explore it yourself first. Test all electronics out before the kids are there (projectors, cables, etc) so that you don’t have any technical problems along the way. Good Luck!

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