From Computer Labs to Makerspaces

So nearly 7 months into our official opening of the Makerspace, I thought I would spend  a few minutes and honestly reflect on how it is going (more for my own sanity than anything).

Overall, it’s been a great learning experience and more the most part, it has been a very positive change for the students and the school. I don’t for one second regret the days of a computer lab and don’t think I could ever go back to teaching “technology” as a stand alone subject. I think those days are behind us and schools really do need to transition from this model to a more flexible learning space that reflects the needs of modern-age pedagogy, devices and learning environments (notice how I purposely didn’t use 21st century learning).

computer-lab

So why maker? Is this simply a new educational fad or buzzword, much like differentiation, learning styles, and performance assessment? Perhaps…but I’m willing to bet that it’s hear to stay much longer. Tools come and go but good ideas tend to stand the test of time. For me, it resonates with all my core beliefs in education; student-centered learning, personalized, authentic learning tasks, inquiry and problem-solving. You could argue that these are all buzz words as well but they are good buzz words, at least ones that have a deeper meaning than the former ones.

However, as much as I love technology, I think we really need to move beyond screens. Yes devices help us learn but they are a tool and there needs to be a balance with real hands-on learning using actual physical objects that don’t behave like perfect virtual models. We need things that break, stick, snap, twist and bend. Now more than ever, kids need to more hands-on experiences. As a Gen-Xer (or Gen Yer), we spent hours building forts, making messes, taking things apart and trying to put things back together again. Maybe this is me just being nostalgic but I feel I have a duty to ensure that kids don’t miss out on this.