Automator for Technology Teachers

I have heard lots of people talk about the benefits of Automator as a way to make trivial tasks automated. It does exactly that and so much more. From a Technology Facilitator’s perspective, you are probably dealing with similar issues of managing multiple computers/laptops/computer labs. One task that I always put off (if I don’t get students to do it first) is emptying the trash and cleaning up the desktop. Well, why not let Automator do this for you in one click of a button? If you are not familiar with Automator, it is super easy to use and figure out.

Assuming you have Apple Remote Desktop client and server installed (another fabulous program), all you need to do is open Automator on the client computer. Click on Workflow and then go down to Utilities. In here, you will discover many tasks that Automator will do that you probably didn’t even think of.

A couple of workflows are posted below:

Here’s the workflow I did to empty all desktop items:

Here’s another one to quickly force quit all open applications (which inevitably happens with students):

Another one I used was to set the sleep time and wake up time. Handy if you are having computers falling asleep at times you don’t want them to.

 

There are probably tons more that would be helpful to Technology Directors or Teachers, if you have a great one, please share.

Minecraft-A new virtual tool for learning

I just read a great post from this blog on Minecraft and thought I would add my thoughts on the subject.

Whenever you mention the word “video game” to a parent, it often brings quite a few negative connotations. Usually the negative words associated with this are: blood, shooting, waste of time, and mindless.  As an adolescent, I remember trying to justify to my mother that hours of playing Nintendo’s Zelda were actually beneficial to me. I would say, “but it improves my hand eye coordination Mom!”  She would often let out a sigh, roll her eyes and give me another 15 minutes to try and complete another level.  At the time, improving hand eye coordination was really the only apparent benefit of playing video games at the apparent cost of so many.

As part of my graduate research,  I have recently been doing quite a bit of academic research on game-based learning. Typically, with any new type of technology, there is a bit of resistance and usually group of critics who often propagate myths without having done the research themselves. I have encountered similar resistance when we first started doing blogging in the classroom (how can blogging possibly improve academic skills?), ipads and mobile devices (they are a distraction and waste of time) and now games.

Fast forward 20 years and gaming is still a huge market.  Video games have evolved into highly sophisticated multiplayer games and strategy-based games that require much more than trying to rapidly tap A, A, B, B, select, start, up, down as fast as you can. Sure, those games certainly exist but new genres have hit the market that require higher-order thinking skills, complex communication, collaboration and problem-solving.  One of those genres, simulation games, is beginning to overlap with other fields such as medicine, military and education.

Watch this fantastic video that paints a nice picture of the role of simulation games in education:

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what are simulation-based games?

Simulation games are virtual games that simulate a real-world experience that are often difficult or dangerous to take part in real life. Some of them are life-based simulation games such as the Sims and others are more construction and strategy based games such as Civilization, SimCity World of Warcraft, and Minecraft.

Games (not just video games) have actually taken quite awhile to be taken seriously by educators.  Games, by themselves, are obviously highly engaging, fun and motivating. However, these reasons alone are not enough to use them educationally. For example, Uno is a fun and engaging game but this alone doesn’t mean that it should be used in the classroom. There needs to be careful planning, goals, integration into the curriculum and reflection built into any type of technology or innovative practice.

I have recently been using Minecraft in the classroom to help develop some important mathematical concepts as well as those higher-order thinkings skills. As a teacher and a bit of a gamer myself, I can clearly see the advantages of leveraging games for learning.

So what is Minecraft?

 

Minecraft is a virtual 3D simulation game in which players need to look for resources to use to craft and build just about anything. There is a one player survival mode where it is just you alone in the world and there are monsters out there so you need to survive. There is also a creative mode feature where you have access to all resources in the game.  There is also a multiplayer mode (my favorite) where you interact and collaborate with people in real-time. Creativity is absolutely endless and I have seen people build ancient pyramids, castles, and even whole cities!

So how can you use Minecraft for learning?

Math-Since Minecraft is in a 3D virtual world, it is very easy to link in geometry and measurement concepts. I had 5th grade students complete a series of challenges involving fractions and percents. I built some structure and students had to figure out what percentage of each material I used. Then, I had them build a house involving some specific percentages of blocks. It is very easy to explore concepts such as volume, area, perimeter, coordinates and measurement. I had 3rd grade students build a real construction of a garden project they did in which they had to use specific perimeter and areas of their garden (planned ahead of time). Then students actually got to grow their own crops in the garden! Video of my idea will be posted below:

 

Geography-Geography is an easy way to explore using Minecraft. Difficult concepts such as topography, mapping skills, types of maps are a natural part of Minecraft. I found a great video by a fellow teacher in which he explored contour maps show below. I am planning out a series of lessons shortly

Economics/Math-Minecraft has plenty of multiplayer servers. Recently, I joined one and I am absolutely amazed at the kind of learning that happens on this. One server has an economy built into it so players receive money from selling their items. People also begin opening up shops selling and trading items. This opens up a real life (sort of) context where students could learn the idea of supply, demand, market prices and how economies are built.

Science-I have been following a high school teacher in Australia who uses Minecraft to teach concepts in biology. For example, he has students construct 3D models of eukaryotic cells. He uses a multiplayer mod to explore how neurotransmitters work.

 

 

 

 

 

Technology tools-Process vs Product

With an increasing number of tools being developed for educators, the endless question seems to come down to process vs product argument.

Some ICT tools available are great for processing and synthesizing information for students. A tool such as Kidspiration or Inspiration help students to mind map concepts. For example, when we were doing a unit on Healthy Choices in Grade 2, students helped to categorize different types of foods according to which needs were met in a Food Pyramid. In this case, students are learning by categorizing information. This ICT tool helps students to learn concepts about nutrition.On the flip side, you could also use the same tool to present their knowledge and understanding about nutrition. This could be at the end of a unit where students could present their learning to a wider audience. Both are valuable assessments (formative vs summative) and both are equally valuable learning tools.

There are an enormous amount of digital tools that could be used for presenting information. Keynote from iLife 08 allows students to present their learning from a unit and share it with other students. iWeb is a fantastic tool that allows students the chance to create a digital portfolio. Students can then reflect on their learning through a unit and summarize it.

As an educator, one needs to carefully look at technology tools to ensure that there is a balance of integrating technology as a tool for process and products.